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    The Digital Couture Collection

    ​Proposing a concept where technologists become the designers of the future, utilising technology as their design tools, to craft the new future human. Immateriality is the A/W’62’ collection of digital skins, inspired by morphogenesis and mineral crystallisation processes, a series of radical non-human like aesthetics have been fashioned. Providing a digital couture service that is tailored to the consumers needs, by facilitating the re-design and enhancement of the physical human-self, to enable the consumer to embody or become the notion of the perfect human.

    - The Future Human, by Jenny Lee from Studio Aikieu

    Also in "This Is What Your Face Will Look Like In 2060"

    Immateriality | The Future Human from jenny lee on Vimeo.

  2. What is the next issue to undergo a sea change in social acceptance?

    “Far more generalized acceptance of widespread variations in human behavior. All of us who were raised pre-Internet were taught that there is something called ‘normal,’ and I think that whole concept might go right out the window.” - Marc Andreessen

    A Vision of the Future From Those Likely to Invent It (New York Times)

  3. Empathy is the ability to see the world from somebody else’s perspective. In order to develop products that customers want to buy the vendors must first attempt to relate to their audience and understand the desires and motivations of their customers.

    Unfortunately most technology companies see empathy as a ‘soft’ and overtly feminine skill that’s downgraded compared to the ‘hard’ skills of engineers. The tech industry traditionally favours individuals who are systemisers — these are people who are able to work with hierarchies, processes and complex inanimate systems.

    These are great skills to have and many of the world’s best companies have discovered how to extract the best from this kind of person.

    Unfortunately companies dominated by systemisers tend to ignore the human aspect. The end-user does not figure within its circuit schematics and design goals. I’ve met people for whom the user is an unfortunate and pesky interface problem — best avoided or left to the marketing types.

    — Why wearable tech is unwearable - Wired http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-01/16/why-wearable-tech-is-unwearable

  4. We must blend the old and the new. Our magic bullet will be made of equal parts past and present. When the lighter was invented, people did not abandon matches, and when the ever popular vibrator popped on the scene, no one made a case for getting rid of the penis. Well, some people did, but I took it from whom it came. We need to communicate more carefully, listen, and speak with more thought. We should not be getting excited about being able to talk to our phones, televisions, and cars until we master the art of hearing and being heard by living organisms.

    — Unsolicited Advice for Living in the End Times - The New inquiry, by Michael Seidenberg

  5. "One problem with social media is its relentless quality. Are we all really just going to keep on tweeting forever?

    - I think people are going to continue to enjoy ambient contact. Twitter may (and probably will, possibly soon) die off; Facebook may (and probably will, possibly soon) die off; indeed, every geegaw we’re using to communicate with each other will die off and be replaced by something new. But that essential behavior—broadcasting bits of our thinkings and doings to other people who are interested to know them—will continue, in whatever form.

    I suspect it’ll continue because it’s a historically robust behavior. For centuries, we paid ambient attention to each other, and used our joint awareness for lots of good things. Studies of journalists in their offices or subway-router workers in their offices, for example, found they’ve always done a lot of “talking out loud”—talking to the room, to no one in particular, because it helped create a floating group self-awareness of what everyone was doing and thinking, and this helped groups of people collaborate. So it’s an old, venerable cognitive technique. It’s just that we now do it with disparate minds, connected over long distances, in interesting new ways.”

    — Interview: Clive Thompson’s “Smarter Than You Think” - New Yorker

  6. Alone together
By Sexsister

    Alone together

    By Sexsister

  7. More often than not, you can find wisdom in advertising.
"Picture a company that thrives as a social network, not as an organisational chart. What if your company’s employees could quickly identify other colleagues and candidates to help them ovecome challenges, and could crowdsource their knowledge across departments, across languages, across oceans?"
"Investing in becoming a social business goes beyond building a social network. It demands capturing and analysing the data that the network creates to remove the technological and cultural boundaries both inside and outside your company."

    More often than not, you can find wisdom in advertising.


    "Picture a company that thrives as a social network, not as an organisational chart. What if your company’s employees could quickly identify other colleagues and candidates to help them ovecome challenges, and could crowdsource their knowledge across departments, across languages, across oceans?"

    "Investing in becoming a social business goes beyond building a social network. It demands capturing and analysing the data that the network creates to remove the technological and cultural boundaries both inside and outside your company."

  8. Influential paper by Klaus Krippendorff that moved design forward ca 1989, via @johnmaeda

    Influential paper by Klaus Krippendorff that moved design forward ca 1989, via @johnmaeda

  9. The internet of things gives us the ability to expose measurements that were previously invisible.

    — GigaOm.com: How can we design an Internet of Things for everyone (not just for alpha geeks)?

  10. Excel sheet art

    Excel sheet art

  11. "The questions being raised about algorithms at the moment are not about algorithms per se, but about the way society is structured with regard to data use and data privacy. It’s also about how models are being used to predict the future. There is currently an awkward marriage between data and algorithms. As technology evolves, there will be mistakes, but it is important to remember they are just a tool. We shouldn’t blame our tools."

    How algorithms rule the world

  12. On technology, dematerialisation and ghost-like presences.

    Room 8 - Edvard Munch: The Modern Eye - Tate Modern, London, 2012

  13. ""New York Biotopes“ deals with abstract plants and creatures, which change their forms because of insufficient living space and adapt themselves to the surroundings of the metropolis New York City. A type of metamorphosis, where the newly developed vegetation assimilates elements of the city and makes them useful for their own purposes. These creatures and plants, partly mechanical, partly organically in appearance, spread more and more over the city and fill it up with life."

    New York Biotopes is a proyect by

  14. From "Connecting", a documentary about the future of Interaction Design and User Experience:

    "Everybody is a little bit too fascinated with making interfaces that look like they can be touched. It’s kind of ironic that we’re trying to make digital things that look a little too real - let’s see how long that last" - Andrei Herasimchuk, Director of Design, Twitter

    "Analog can be wonderful. What’s not wonderful, it’s fake analog (…) Let’s make it about the content, not about the chrome*, as they call it. Chrome is devoid of meaning, aside from just a signal of what metaphor is being used. And every time you see it after that it’s just noise. Whereas the content is always real. Pictures, movies, stories, these things will never go out of style. So bridging that somehow, making use of the knowledge, of the metaphor, without imitating it, I think is the sweet spot" - Blaise Agüera y Arcas, Architect of Bing Mobile and Bing Maps

    * The visible graphical interface features of an application.

    Via Co.Design “8 Insights About The Coming Era Of Interactive Design

  15. Chirp makes machines sing and share data.

    chirp.io