1. "Selfies of a new kind, scrambled, troubled, troubling…"
French artists Chloé Curé and Bertrand Lanthiez created a “mirror” effect with just water and speakers. It’s an interactive art project titled “We are Narcissus.” The longer a person stares into the mirror and gazes at their own reflection, the more their face gets distorted—leading the person “to question their relation to their own image.”

    "Selfies of a new kind, scrambled, troubled, troubling…"

    French artists Chloé Curé and Bertrand Lanthiez created a “mirror” effect with just water and speakers. It’s an interactive art project titled “We are Narcissus.” The longer a person stares into the mirror and gazes at their own reflection, the more their face gets distorted—leading the person “to question their relation to their own image.”

  2. Rules for generative art

    "Sol LeWitt was an artist. A very clever one at that. At some point, he questioned the value of art that was “created” by one hand – the artist. Instead of creating art – the output. He created the input – the rules. So his art became sets of rules by which his draftsmen used as a basis to create his art. Genius. [..] The rules or the “system” are the art. It’s computational art without computers."

    - Learn to Code – 3.0 Sol LeWitt Retrospective

  3. In a blinding flash of inspiration, the other day I realized that ‘interactive’ anything is the wrong word. Interactive makes you imagine people sitting with their hands on controls, some kind of gamelike thing. The right word is ‘unfinished.’ Think of cultural products, or art works, or the people who use them even, as being unfinished. Permanently unfinished

    — 

    Brian Eno

    "2013: The Year ‘the Stream’ Crested" - The Atlantic

  4. Auto-generative art

    Volkswagen Golf GTI + Underworld have collaborated on a project that synchronises driving and music in real time

  5. As seen at Tate Modern’s exhibition “Paul Klee - Making visible (2013)” http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/ey-exhibition-paul-klee-making-visible

    As seen at Tate Modern’s exhibition “Paul Klee - Making visible (2013)” http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/ey-exhibition-paul-klee-making-visible

  6. Jeremy Olson

    Jeremy Olson

  7. Life is beautiful
by nicopergola

    Life is beautiful

    by nicopergola

  8. Portrait from Shinseungback Kimyonghun, a Seoul-based art collective. The project uses facial recognition software to look for faces and then generate average portraits from popular movies.

    Portrait from Shinseungback Kimyonghun, a Seoul-based art collective. The project uses facial recognition software to look for faces and then generate average portraits from popular movies.

  9. This is how I see the floaters inside my eye.

    This is how I see the floaters inside my eye.

  10. Excel sheet art

    Excel sheet art

  11. Ghostagram

    Ghostagram

  12. This paper argues that to create ‘generative’ systems is a rigorous and intricate procedure. Moreover, the output from generative systems should not be valued simply as an endless, infinite series of resources but as a system. To have a machine write poetry for ten years would not generate creative music, but the process of getting the machine to do so would certainly register an advanced form of creativity.

    — 

    "How I Drew One of My Pictures: or, The Authorship of Generative Art" by Adrian Ward BSc & Geoff Cox MA (RCA)

    http://generative.net/papers/authorship/index.html

  13. The future of credit

    The future of credit

  14. Ben Weiner’s immaculately hyper-realistic canvases and films precisely capture the essence of their subject: paint itself.
“My process derives from my interest in medium specificity, a practice in which art analyzes the means of its own creation”.
“I am interested in the way a microscopic view allows a person an intimate knowledge of the workings of a subject, while simultaneously alienating them from their normal experience of that subject… the blobs of paint in my paintings appear alien and otherworldly, even though they depict the stuff from which they’re made.”
From Artsy.net “Ben Weiner on painting paint”

    Ben Weiner’s immaculately hyper-realistic canvases and films precisely capture the essence of their subject: paint itself.

    “My process derives from my interest in medium specificity, a practice in which art analyzes the means of its own creation”.

    “I am interested in the way a microscopic view allows a person an intimate knowledge of the workings of a subject, while simultaneously alienating them from their normal experience of that subject… the blobs of paint in my paintings appear alien and otherworldly, even though they depict the stuff from which they’re made.”

    From Artsy.net “Ben Weiner on painting paint

  15. On technology, dematerialisation and ghost-like presences.

    Room 8 - Edvard Munch: The Modern Eye - Tate Modern, London, 2012