1. Secret app product design principles

    Secret — the anonymous secret-sharing mobile app that’s become a visual, gossip-filled addiction in Silicon Valley — Chris Bader and co-founder and CEO David Byttow, decided every design decision should be made to enable the simplest way to share, read and interact with the text (the secrets) themselves.

    Bader’s four product design principles:

    1. Start from emotion — This isn’t a new concept, says Bader, but Apple’s design team embodies this and I agree with them.
    2. Tell a story — The user should be able to fit the whole product in his or her mind at once. You should be able to think about what Secret is and not spend more than one brain cycle piecing it together.
    3. Keep a balance — Positive experiences need to outweigh the negative ones (which can be prevalent on an anonymous app). The experience needs to be a net positive.
    4. Live by constraints — It’s great to use “blue-sky thinking” to brainstorm and come up with ideas, but when it comes time to implementing design, set constraints.

    Bader’s 3 rules for building home run social products:

    1. Allow for a novel form of self expression
    2. Make it stupidly simple to express yourself
    3. Make it rewarding.

    The design decisions behind the tech industry’s beloved anonymous Secret app

  2. thenewinquiry:

The ephemerality sharpens viewers’ focus: Once received, a Snapchat count-down is a kind of time-bomb that demands an urgency of vision, a challenge to exhaust the meaning from the image before the clock runs out. Unlike a paper photo that fades slowly over the years, the temporary photo disappears suddenly. Given only a peek, you look hard.
-Nathan Jurgenson, Pics and It Didn’t Happen

    thenewinquiry:

    The ephemerality sharpens viewers’ focus: Once received, a Snapchat count-down is a kind of time-bomb that demands an urgency of vision, a challenge to exhaust the meaning from the image before the clock runs out. Unlike a paper photo that fades slowly over the years, the temporary photo disappears suddenly. Given only a peek, you look hard.

    -Nathan Jurgenson, Pics and It Didn’t Happen

  3. Chirp makes machines sing and share data.

    chirp.io