1. Secret app product design principles

    Secret — the anonymous secret-sharing mobile app that’s become a visual, gossip-filled addiction in Silicon Valley — Chris Bader and co-founder and CEO David Byttow, decided every design decision should be made to enable the simplest way to share, read and interact with the text (the secrets) themselves.

    Bader’s four product design principles:

    1. Start from emotion — This isn’t a new concept, says Bader, but Apple’s design team embodies this and I agree with them.
    2. Tell a story — The user should be able to fit the whole product in his or her mind at once. You should be able to think about what Secret is and not spend more than one brain cycle piecing it together.
    3. Keep a balance — Positive experiences need to outweigh the negative ones (which can be prevalent on an anonymous app). The experience needs to be a net positive.
    4. Live by constraints — It’s great to use “blue-sky thinking” to brainstorm and come up with ideas, but when it comes time to implementing design, set constraints.

    Bader’s 3 rules for building home run social products:

    1. Allow for a novel form of self expression
    2. Make it stupidly simple to express yourself
    3. Make it rewarding.

    The design decisions behind the tech industry’s beloved anonymous Secret app

  2. "One problem with social media is its relentless quality. Are we all really just going to keep on tweeting forever?

    - I think people are going to continue to enjoy ambient contact. Twitter may (and probably will, possibly soon) die off; Facebook may (and probably will, possibly soon) die off; indeed, every geegaw we’re using to communicate with each other will die off and be replaced by something new. But that essential behavior—broadcasting bits of our thinkings and doings to other people who are interested to know them—will continue, in whatever form.

    I suspect it’ll continue because it’s a historically robust behavior. For centuries, we paid ambient attention to each other, and used our joint awareness for lots of good things. Studies of journalists in their offices or subway-router workers in their offices, for example, found they’ve always done a lot of “talking out loud”—talking to the room, to no one in particular, because it helped create a floating group self-awareness of what everyone was doing and thinking, and this helped groups of people collaborate. So it’s an old, venerable cognitive technique. It’s just that we now do it with disparate minds, connected over long distances, in interesting new ways.”

    — Interview: Clive Thompson’s “Smarter Than You Think” - New Yorker

  3. Alone together
By Sexsister

    Alone together

    By Sexsister

  4. It seems odd that at the beginning of the Internet everyone decided everything should stick around forever

    — The Cut: “All My Exes Live in Texts: Why the Social Media Generation Never Really Breaks Up”

  5. Introducing Chirp from chirp on Vimeo.

    Chirp makes machines sing and share data.

    chirp.io

  6. thekhooll:

    Alka-Seltzer

    These aesthetically pleasing ads  are simple stencil forms  cleverly set in humorously terrifying circumstances that effectively and clearly evoke  “I need an Alka Seltzer” feeling. The Alka Seltzer campaign was developed at CLM BBDO, Paris, by creative directors Gilles Fichteberg and Jean-François Sacco, art director/illustrator Paul Kreitmann, and copywriter Alexis Benoit

  7. "People are tired of playing the upgrade game, but at the same time consumerism and the marketplace are forcing people to keep up with the hot tech. Then you get Instagram and suddenly nobody cares because all your photos are immediately cropped and de-rezed to like 300x300. Nobody knows what kind of camera you have. It’s refreshing.
In short you’ve got a system that both frees you from the upgrade race and imbues whatever you shoot with the ghost of authenticity. It’s a win-win.And it’s worth one billion dollars.”
From: “Instagram and the Quest for Authenticity in Social Media” - http://culturemagazine.ca/culture/instagram_and_the_quest_for_authenticity_in_social_media.html

    "People are tired of playing the upgrade game, but at the same time consumerism and the marketplace are forcing people to keep up with the hot tech. Then you get Instagram and suddenly nobody cares because all your photos are immediately cropped and de-rezed to like 300x300. Nobody knows what kind of camera you have. It’s refreshing.


    In short you’ve got a system that both frees you from the upgrade race and imbues whatever you shoot with the ghost of authenticity. It’s a win-win.

    And it’s worth one billion dollars.”

    From: “Instagram and the Quest for Authenticity in Social Media” - http://culturemagazine.ca/culture/instagram_and_the_quest_for_authenticity_in_social_media.html