1. Secret app product design principles

    Secret — the anonymous secret-sharing mobile app that’s become a visual, gossip-filled addiction in Silicon Valley — Chris Bader and co-founder and CEO David Byttow, decided every design decision should be made to enable the simplest way to share, read and interact with the text (the secrets) themselves.

    Bader’s four product design principles:

    1. Start from emotion — This isn’t a new concept, says Bader, but Apple’s design team embodies this and I agree with them.
    2. Tell a story — The user should be able to fit the whole product in his or her mind at once. You should be able to think about what Secret is and not spend more than one brain cycle piecing it together.
    3. Keep a balance — Positive experiences need to outweigh the negative ones (which can be prevalent on an anonymous app). The experience needs to be a net positive.
    4. Live by constraints — It’s great to use “blue-sky thinking” to brainstorm and come up with ideas, but when it comes time to implementing design, set constraints.

    Bader’s 3 rules for building home run social products:

    1. Allow for a novel form of self expression
    2. Make it stupidly simple to express yourself
    3. Make it rewarding.

    The design decisions behind the tech industry’s beloved anonymous Secret app

  2. 14 April 2014

    273,028 notes

    Reblogged from
    hi

    (Source: hi)

  3. (Source: ovtro)

  4. prostheticknowledge:

    Apple Patents for Automatic 3D Avatar Creation and Emotional States

    Something to expect in the future in regards to online identity (both of which were filed today):

    A three-dimensional (“3D”) avatar can be automatically created that resembles the physical appearance of an individual captured in one or more input images or video frames. The avatar can be further customized by the individual in an editing environment and used in various applications, including but not limited to gaming, social networking and video conferencing.

    I wonder if this will be connected to Apple’s purchase of depth sensor company Primesense [Link to patent file]

    Methods, systems, and computer-readable media for creating and using customized avatar instances to reflect current user states are disclosed. In various implementations, the user states can be defines using trigger events based on user-entered textual data, emoticons, or states of the device being used. For each user state, a customized avatar instance having a facial expression, body language, accessories, clothing items, and/or a presentation scheme reflective of the user state can be generated.

    [Link to patent file]

  5. 8 April 2014

    147 notes

    Reblogged from
    algopop

    algopop:

“As algorithmic systems become more prevalent, I’ve begun to notice of a variety of emergent behaviors evolving to work around these constraints, to deal with the insufficiency of these black box systems…The first behavior is adaptation. These are situations where I bend to the system’s will. For example, adaptations to the shortcomings of voice UI systems — mispronouncing a friend’s name to get my phone to call them; overenunciating; or speaking in a different accent because of the cultural assumptions built into voice recognition. We see people contort their behavior to perform for the system so that it responds optimally.”
Alexis Lloyd (NYTimes R&D) shares some interesting views under the title In the Loop: Designing Conversations with Algorithms.

    algopop:

    As algorithmic systems become more prevalent, I’ve begun to notice of a variety of emergent behaviors evolving to work around these constraints, to deal with the insufficiency of these black box systems…The first behavior is adaptation. These are situations where I bend to the system’s will. For example, adaptations to the shortcomings of voice UI systems — mispronouncing a friend’s name to get my phone to call them; overenunciating; or speaking in a different accent because of the cultural assumptions built into voice recognition. We see people contort their behavior to perform for the system so that it responds optimally.”

    Alexis Lloyd (NYTimes R&D) shares some interesting views under the title In the Loop: Designing Conversations with Algorithms.

  6. sensationalizm:

by

    sensationalizm:

    by

  7. "But big data do not solve the problem that has obsessed statisticians and scientists for centuries: the problem of insight, of inferring what is going on, and figuring out how we might intervene to change a system for the better."

    "Statisticians are scrambling to develop new methods to seize the opportunity of big data. Such new methods are essential but they will work by building on the old statistical lessons, not by ignoring them."



    "“Big data” has arrived, but big insights have not. The challenge now is to solve new problems and gain new answers – without making the same old statistical mistakes on a grander scale than ever."

    Big data: are we making a big mistake? by Tim Harford, FT Magazine

  8. nymphoninjas:

crotchfairy

    nymphoninjas:

    crotchfairy

  9. 26 March 2014

    1,190 notes

    Reblogged from
    p1ss

  10. Photo: dennisbehm (Flickr)

    Photo: dennisbehm (Flickr)

  11. 17 March 2014

    8,754 notes

    Reblogged from
    auzo

    (Source: auzo)

  12. Visions from pop culture
Modern Talking - "You’re My Heart, You’re My Soul" (1985)

    Visions from pop culture

    Modern Talking - "You’re My Heart, You’re My Soul" (1985)

  13. The mind is a set of information-processing machines that were designed by natural selection to solve adaptive problems faced by our hunter-gatherer ancestors.

    — Evolutionary Psychology: A Primer

  14. I feel like it is legitimate to express concern about overuse of devices or social media and how it may alienate some, and I have just chosen to approach the subject from a different angle. The best possible scenario is for everyone, regardless of their varying optimism on the issue, to acknowledge that the new normal involves the pressures and benefits of multiple devices and an unprecedented amount of information flowing through us. There is nothing reactionary in acknowledging that this can be problematic, and it is our role as artists to offer insights as to how best to navigate this predicament. The only people I fundamentally disagree with are those who stubbornly ignore such issues altogether, dip out, and pretend like it’s 1989 or something. I guess the principal thing I stand for is educating oneself about the potentials and pitfalls of contemporary technology such that you can use it for positive ends. Debate around these issues is a crucial part of that.

    — Web Exclusive: Interview with Holly Herndon - The Indy (via new-aesthetic)

  15. Like a ghost: invisible, but present